Category Archives: Regulation

2016 Is Ramping Up For Telemedicine Developments

Two months in and this year has already seen significant movement in regulatory action across the country to expand the ability to provide telemedicine services. Below please find some of the more significant items that have already gone into effect in 2016 or are under consideration, including commercial payor and Medicaid reimbursement coverage for telemedicine services, reciprocal licenses for out-of-state providers and the ability to prescribe without an in-person evaluation.

Parity Laws in New York and Connecticut

Effective January 1, 2016, New York passed a Chapter Amendment clarifying last year’s telemedicine commercial coverage statute.  Under the 2016 Chapter Amendment, private insurers are required to cover services via telemedicine if provided by hospitals, home care and hospice agencies, licensed physicians, physician assistants, dentists, nurses, midwives, podiatrists, optometrists, ophthalmic dispensers, psychologists, social workers, speech language pathologists and audiologists.  The parity law prohibits an insurer from excluding from coverage a service provided via telehealth if that service is otherwise covered in-person.

The law also provides for Medicaid reimbursement to providers for telehealth services, which is defined broadly to include real-time two-way electronic audio visual communications, asynchronous store and forward technology and remote patient monitoring. However, with the exception of remote patient monitoring, telehealth will not be reimbursed by Medicaid when the patient is located in their home.  The New York Department of Health is expected to release telemedicine regulations later this year.

Similarly, Connecticut also recently passed a new telemedicine parity law that went into effect January 1, 2016. Under Connecticut’s parity law, commercial insurers must provide coverage for services rendered via telemedicine under the same terms and conditions as would apply if that service was provided in-person.  Connecticut broadly defines telehealth to include services performed by a telehealth provider at a distant site as well as synchronous interactions, asynchronous store and forward transfers and remote patient monitoring.

Notably, Connecticut went even farther than New York in its telehealth parity law by expressly preventing a health plan from excluding a service from coverage solely because the service is provided through telehealth and not in-person. In this way, a health plan cannot exclude a telehealth service, such as remote patient monitoring, simply because it does not lend itself to an in-person professional service.

Florida’s Controlled Substance Teleprescription Law

Florida recently implemented a new rule to permit physicians to prescribe controlled substances via telemedicine exclusively for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, effective March 4, 2016. Specifically, the amended regulation provides that controlled substances may not be prescribed through the use of telemedicine, “except for the treatment of psychiatric disorders.”

However, after passing this new rule, the Florida Board of Medicine recognized that it is still restricted by the Federal Ryan Haight Online Pharmacy Consumer Protection Act of 2008.  The Ryan Haight Act narrowly permits the remote prescription of controlled substances for patients without an in-person evaluation so long as the patient is: (1) physically located in a hospital or clinic with a valid DEA registration; and (2) treated by a DEA registered practitioner in the usual course of professional practice and in accordance with state law.  Accordingly, while Florida is expanding its telemedicine laws, the prescription of controlled substances via telemedicine will only be broadly permissible if the American Telemedicine Association, or other organizations, are successful in amending the Ryan Haight Act.

Newly Introduced Telemedicine Bills in New Jersey and Ohio

Various other states are also in the process of trying to pass telemedicine bills. For example, New Jersey recently introduced a bill on February 8, 2016, that would require private payors to provide coverage for telemedicine to the same extent that the services would be covered if they were provided through an in-person consultation.

Additionally, another NJ telemedicine bill was introduced on January 12, 2016, which would provide a mechanism for physicians and other health care providers to obtain reciprocal licenses to practice in New Jersey if the providers are licensed by another state in their particular specialty.  The bill would also provide a parity law for telemedicine services to be reimbursed under NJ Medicaid.  As a similar bill was proposed in 2015 and has now carried over into the 2016 session, the likelihood of its passing is even greater.

An Ohio legislative bill is also headed to the Senate that would allow patients to obtain prescriptions (for non-controlled substances) without an in-person exam or visit from a health care provider.

For more information on telehealth and telemedicine legal and regulatory considerations, continued legislative developments or related issues, please feel free to contact Daniel Meier or any member of our health care practice group for a further discussion.

OIG Announces Proposed AKS and CMP Regulations

On October 3, 2014, the Office of the Inspector General (“OIG”) issued a proposed rule codifying into regulation several statutory changes to the Antikickback Statute (“AKS”) and the Civil Monetary Penalty (“CMP”) Law. Nearly all of these changes broaden permissible arrangements for certain health care and health service providers. The OIG is seeking public comment regarding how to best balance the promotion of beneficial arrangements that enhance the efficient and effective delivery of health care and promote the best interests of patients, while simultaneously avoiding payment arrangements that risk abuse of Federal health care programs or program beneficiaries. Comments about these proposed regulations are due to the OIG no later than December 2, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. EST. The proposed regulations in their entirety are available here. Selected proposed changes are described below.

Antikickback Regulations

1.   Cost-Sharing Waiver Safe Harbors. The OIG proposes to codify as regulations AKS safe harbors for certain cost-sharing waivers determined to be low risk to Federal health care programs.

a.   Safe Harbor for Part D Cost-Sharing Waivers by Pharmacies. A pharmacy waiving Part D cost-sharing for a beneficiary would qualify for the safe harbor when:
(i) the waiver is not advertised or part of a solicitation;
(ii) the pharmacy does not routinely waive the cost sharing; and
(iii) before waiving cost-sharing, the pharmacy either determines in good faith that the beneficiary has a financial need or the pharmacy fails to collect the cost-sharing amount after making a reasonable effort to do so.
Conditions (ii) and (iii) do not apply to a subsidy-eligible individual.

b.   Safe Harbor for Cost-Sharing Waivers for Emergency Ambulance Services. Emergency ambulance providers and suppliers that are paid by Medicare fee-for-service and are owned and operated by a State, a political subdivision, or a Federally recognized Indian tribe would receive AKS safe harbor protection for arrangements when:
(i) the ambulance provider or supplier is the Medicare Part B provider or supplier of the services;                                                                                                        (ii) the waiver is offered uniformly, without regard to patient-specific factors;
(iii) the waiver is not the furnishing of free services paid for by a government entity; and
(iv) the provider or supplier bears the cost of the waiver.

2.   AKS Remuneration Exceptions. The OIG proposes to codify as regulations two recent statutory exceptions to the definition of remuneration.

a.   Medicare Coverage Gap Discount Program Exception. Applicable drugs provided at a discount to applicable beneficiaries under the Medicare Coverage Gap Discount Program would be excepted from the AKS definition of remuneration if the drug manufacturer is a compliant participant in the Medicare Coverage Gap Discount Program.

b.   Local Transportation Services Exception. Excepted from the AKS definition of remuneration would be free or discounted local (no more than 25 miles away) transportation made available by an individual or entity to established patients who are Federal health care program beneficiaries for the purpose of obtaining medically necessary items or services when:
(i) the individual or entity providing the transportation services does not primarily supply health care items and bears the cost of the transportation services;
(ii) the availability of transportation services is not determined in a manner related to the volume or value of Federal health care program business;
(iii) the transportation services are not air, luxury, or ambulance-level services; and
(iv) the transportation services are not marketed or advertised and drivers or others arranging the transportation are not paid per beneficiary transported.

Civil Monetary Penalty Regulations

1.   CMP Remuneration Exceptions. The OIG proposes to codify as regulations recent statutory exceptions to the CMP rule definition of remuneration. The proposed regulations additionally provide proposed definitions of terms intended to help interpret these exceptions. Proposed exceptions to the CMP rule definition of remuneration include:

(a)   Reductions by a hospital of the copayment amount for covered outpatient department services to no less than 20% of the Medicare outpatient department fee schedule.

(b)   Remuneration promoting access to care and posing a low risk of harm to patients and Federal health care programs.

(c)   Retailer rewards programs consisting of coupons, rebates, or other rewards from a retailer offering items or services on equal terms to all members of the public and which are not tied to the provision of other items or services reimbursed in any part by Medicare or an applicable State health care program.

(d)   The offer of certain items or services for free or at less than fair market value after making a good faith determination that the recipient is in financial need and when the items or services are not advertised.

(e)   Certain copayment waivers for the first fill of a covered Part D generic drug for beneficiaries enrolled in the Medicare Prescription Drug Plan or the Medicare Advantage Part D Plan.

2.   Gainsharing Prohibition. The OIG proposes codify the statutory gainsharing prohibition that forbids hospitals from knowingly making a payment to a physician as an inducement to reduce or limit services provided to Medicare or Medicaid beneficiaries under the care of that physician. In doing so, the OIG acknowledges that it seeks to strike a balance that interprets the prohibition broadly enough to protect Federal health care program beneficiaries, and narrowly enough to allow low risk programs that further the goal of delivering high quality health care at a lower cost. Furthermore, in the proposed regulations the OIG acknowledges that it has previously allowed certain gainsharing arrangements through its advisory opinion process and that it seeks comment regarding an interpretation of the statute that permits the implementation of low risk, beneficial gainsharing arrangements.

If you have questions about these proposed regulations, or about fraud and abuse compliance for Federal health care program participants generally, contact Heather E. Baird, or any member of the Benesch Health Care Department.

OIG Proposes New Revisions to Civil Monetary Penalty Regulations

On May 12th, the Office of the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services (OIG) issued a proposed rule which would amend the federal civil monetary penalty (CMP) regulations addressing new CMP authorities created under the Affordable Care Act.  The revised regulations would allow for civil penalties, assessments, and exclusion from Medicare for :

  • Failure to grant OIG timely access to records;
  • ordering or prescribing while excluded;
  • making false statements, omissions, or misrepresentations in an enrollment application;
  • failure to report and return an overpayment; and
  • making or using a false record or statement that is material to a false or fraudulent claim.

Comments on the proposed regulations can be submitted up until July 11, 2014.  The proposed rule and instructions for submitting comments can be viewed here—> Proposed CMP Regulatory Revisions

For more information on the revisions to the CMP regulations, Fraud and Abuse, Compliance, Medicare Program Integrity initiatives or related issues, please feel free to contact Ari Markenson or any member of our health care practice group for a further discussion.

CMS Implements Fingerprinting Background Checks for New DME and Home Health Providers

In a recently released MLN Matters (Number: SE1417), CMS announced that it is implementing the enhanced enrollment screening provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) by requiring finger print based background checks for certain so called “high risk” providers. Currently this means that for newly enrolling Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetic, Orthotic and Supplies (DMEPOS) suppliers and Home Health Agencies, individuals with a 5% or greater ownership interest in the provider or supplier will be subject to criminal background checks based on fingerprint identification. The procedure will also apply to providers that CMS has elevated to the high risk category pursuant to regulations. Affected providers will be notified by their MAC and be given 30 days to comply. The notification will identify contact information for the Fingerprint Based Background Check Contractor (FBBC). Continue reading

CMS Final Rule on Moratoria for the Enrollment of New Home Health Agencies and Ambulance Suppliers and Providers

On February 4, 2014, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued in the Federal Register a notice of temporary moratoria on enrollment of new home health agencies (HHA) and ambulance suppliers and providers in certain geographic locations across the U.S. The moratoria were effective on January 30, 2014. CMS also extended existing moratoria noticed on July 31, 2013. Continue reading

Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Expands Telehealth Coverage in 2014

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) recently released the final rule for Medicare’s Physician Fee Schedule for 2014 Calendar Year (“CY).  While physicians are expected to see a 20.1% reduction to their Medicare payments, the Fee Schedule also includes expanded coverage for telehealth services and increased reimbursement payments for such services. Continue reading

Protecting Your Organization From Exclusion Sanctions – Compliance Today Article

The federal government has a wide array of sanctions it can levy against individuals and organizations that run afoul of the laws and regulations governing Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal healthcare programs.
One of its most effective tools is the ability to exclude persons convicted of certain criminal or civil violations from further participation in federal healthcare programs. Protecting your organization from individuals and entities that are excluded is an integral part of the operations of any organization that does business with federal health care programs.

Ari J. Markenson and Kelly Skeat discuss these issues in a recent article in the September issue of the Health Care Compliance Association’s Compliance Today magazine.

A copy of the article can be found here —> Protecting Your Organization From Exclusion Sanctions