Tag Archives: DME

OIG Report: Finds Questionable Billing of Nearly $17 Million for Sleep Study Services

On October 9, 2013, the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General’s (OIG) Office of Evaluation and Inspections (OEI) issued a report (OEI-05-12-00340) entitled “Questionable Billing for Polysomnography Services.”  The report found that Medicare paid nearly $17 million for sleep study (polysomnography) services that did not meet one or more of the three Medicare requirements and that 180 providers demonstrated patterns of questionable billing for these services.  The OIG chose to study this issue because Medicare spending for sleep study services rose from $407 million to $565 million from 2005 to 2011, and fraud investigators and sleep medicine professionals have identified specific vulnerabilities regarding polysomnography services.  The findings of the OIG’s report are significant because just as we accurately predicted that the OIG’s December 2010 Report: “Questionable Billing by Skilled Nursing Facilities” would generate increased investigations of therapy services for skilled nursing facilities (“SNFs”), the findings in this Report represents an area in which sleep study service providers can also expect increased enforcement. Continue reading

Health Reform Includes Face to Face Practitioner Encounters for HHAs and DME

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, H.R. 3590 (the “Health Reform Bill”) includes statutory provisions requiring face to face practitioner encounter requirements for home health certifications and prior to the provision of orders for durable medical equipment.

In the home health context, Title VI, Subtitle E, Section §6407(a) of the Health Reform Bill amends 42 U.S.C. §1395f(a)(2)(c). The amendment adds a condition to the existing conditions for payment.  The new condition provides that prior to making a certification that a patient meets the criteria for Medicare-covered home health services,  the physician “must document that the physician himself or herself has had a face-to-face encounter with the [patient] within a reasonable timeframe as determined by the Secretary’’. At some point in the near future, CMS will likely publish regulations defining “reasonable timeframe”.

In the durable medical equipment context, Title VI, Subtitle E, Section §6407(b) of the Health Reform Bill amends 42 U.S.C. §1395m(a)(11)(B). The amendment adds a condition to the existing conditions for payment.  The new condition provides that prior to providing an order for durable medical equipment under the Medicare program, “a physician, a physician assistant, a nurse practitioner, or a clinical nurse specialist [must have] had a face-to-face encounter with the [patient] during the 6-month period preceding such written order, or other reasonable timeframe as determined by the Secretary.’’ To the extent that CMS wants to redefine the timeframe, it will likely publish regulations in the future.

Additionally, Title VI, Subtitle E, Section §6407(d) of the Health Reform Bill provides that the encounter requirements shall apply to similar home health certifications or orders for durable medical equipment in the Medicaid program.